NEUROPLASTICITY: CHANGING MINDS AND CHANGING BRAINS

  • James Bylund

Resumo

As a school psychologist I have found that many of the students, parents, and educators that I work with believe that intelligence is a “fixed” trait.  Despite popular belief, however, as we learn more about the structure and function of the brain it is increasingly clear that the brain changes as we learn from, and adapt to, environmental demands.  These changes in the structure and function of the brain in turn produce changes in behavior, and I use behavior to refer to any observable action including the demonstration of cognitive and academic skills.  In the following article I discuss the topic of neuroplasticity citing the work Mark Rosenwieg and Michael Merzenich, two of the foremost researchers on the topic.  Further, I discuss some implications of neuroplasticity on the practice of school psychology. 

Publicado
2015-12-16
Como Citar
BYLUND, James. NEUROPLASTICITY: CHANGING MINDS AND CHANGING BRAINS. Augusto Guzzo Revista Acadêmica, São Paulo, v. 1, n. 15, p. 51-55, dec. 2015. ISSN 2316-3852. Disponível em: <https://fics.edu.br/index.php/augusto_guzzo/article/view/264>. Acesso em: 23 june 2021. doi: https://doi.org/10.22287/ag.v1i15.264.

Palavras-chave

Psychologist, environmental, skills, cognitive. Work.